Tech – for Everyone

Tech Tips and Tricks & Advice – written in plain English.

Hacker’s Returned Mail, Scammer’s Yahoo Calendar

Two *new* Internet security items for you folks to be alert to:

You have probably received an automated e-mail “delivery failure” notice before, so the cybercrooks are hoping that familiarity (and your curiosity) will get you to click your way to a virus infection with this “look alike” scam.

new_attack

Scammers use “image spam” to bypass your filters (see below), now they are using legit links – in this case Yahoo! Calendar – to lend an air of respectability, as your link scanner tool will give you an “OK” (in this example, WOT).

new_scam156

From:Alex Saviour (alexsaviour@yahoo.com)

http://calendar.yahoo.com/alexsaviourv=126&a1(obfuscated)

Image spam is a kind of E-mail spam where the message text of the spam is presented as a picture in an image file. Since most modern graphical E-mail client software will render the image file by default, presenting the message image directly to the user, it is highly effective at circumventing normal E-mail filtering software.

A game of cat and mouse…

3) Bonus!
And I thought this one was kind of interesting: “to make sure our attack website works.. please make sure you use JavaScript.”

spam asks for JavaScript enable

Copyright 2007-2010 © Tech Paul. All Rights Reserved. jaanix post to jaanix.


>> Folks, don’t miss an article! To get Tech – for Everyone articles delivered to your e-mail Inbox, click here, or to subscribe in your RSS reader, click here. <<


Share this post :

April 5, 2010 - Posted by | cyber crime, hackers, Internet, Internet scam, Phishing, phraud, security, spam and junk mail | ,

5 Comments »

  1. The rigid attention we have to apply to everything we do on our computers is mind boggling, in order to stay ahead of the hackers.
    The idea that “this can’t happen to me” is long gone. The awareness and application of these dangers is as worthy as any course one would take in college.

    Thanks Paul for keeping us informed.
    g.

    Like

    Comment by Anonymous | April 6, 2010 | Reply

    • g,
      They called the Internet the “information superhighway”.

      I posit that when “driving” on the superhighway, one should know the “rules of the road”, and be alert, and exercise good “defensive driving” habits.
      Also, one should keep their “vehicle” in good working order and that it should be equipped with safety equipment… like a car has seatbelts, your PC should have antivirus (yes, Macs too).

      In this country, folks are instructed in “Driver’s Ed”, and tested before they are issued a drivers license and allowed onto the highways — there is no such “Drivers Ed” for the Internet. You buy your “car” and off you go.
      I – and other writers like me – try to provide that basic education.

      Like

      Comment by techpaul | April 6, 2010 | Reply

  2. Hey Paul, what a great analogy , Rules of the Road, Drivers Ed… would be great if those thoughts were applied in this age of technology, starting with our computers.

    Thanks for the thoughts…
    g.

    Like

    Comment by Anonymous | April 6, 2010 | Reply

    • The idea of mandatory training, and then passing a competency exam, and earning a “surfer’s license” could be a profitable one, and I think it would help people tremendously (as well as making the Internet safer/reducing spam/etc.).

      However, I think a different “carrot-and-stick” method is more likely to be implemented: namely, blocking access to people who are infected/not running antivirus/not “patched” with the latest Updates, and so forth — simple ISP-level NAC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_Access_Control) could quite easily be effected. The technology is already there.

      Like

      Comment by techpaul | April 6, 2010 | Reply

  3. […] and offers from scammers, internet users today have to be careful and use good judgement…. (Tech Paul’s article), Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)Teleport Your Operating System with […]

    Like

    Pingback by Another Tool for Malware « TTC Shelbyville – Technical Blog | April 6, 2010 | Reply


Post your Comment/Question

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: