Tech – for Everyone

Tech Tips and Tricks & Advice – written in plain English.

Stargazing In Shirtsleeves

A very rare night here (it’s actually warm) that is just perfect for pointing a telescope up at the sky.

How long has it been?

Long time for me. Kinda fun.

Too long.. anywho:

For those who have less than ideal conditions.. perhaps you missed my article on perhaps the neato-keen-est astronomy “app” ever devised (yet). Worldwide Telescope Now In Your Browser. (Includes a video “demo”.)

Aprés pos of nottin’ at all: Today, it so happened, I had a chance to watch some tree guys bring down a REALLY, really tall tree.. Section by section. Man. I got “nervous” for the one guy chainsawing up near the tippy-top. No wonder those guys make a decent penny. Yikes!

It’s something to see, if you’ve never watched..

Today’s quote:It ain’t what they call you, it’s what you answer to.” ~ W.C. Fields

Copyright 2007-2012 © “Tech Paul” (Paul Eckstrom). All Rights Reserved.


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All we really have, in the end, are our stories.
Make yours great ones. Ones to be proud of.

October 1, 2012 Posted by | Internet, software | , , , , | Leave a comment

Slooh

No, I have not had too much to drink. Slooh is a website. A space camera website.

Starting at 2:30 (Pacific) today, you can watch multiple live feeds of the Venus transit on slooh.com

“ABOUT THE NEXT EVENT

The last transit of Venus in our lifetime – catch it live on Slooh from multiple feeds worldwide at t-minus zero – FREE to the public. Patrick Paolucci and Bob Berman will helm the 8 hour broadcast alongside many guests, including scientists, filmmakers, researchers, and astronomers..”

If you are at all interested in stars and nebulae and telescopes, etc. (aka “astronomy”) be sure to click the link and take a look at this interesting website (with a funny name): slooh.com.

My thanks to the alert reader who brought this to my attention (you know who you are).

Today’s free download: Emsisoft Emergency Kit 2.0 available!

The first portable dual-engine emergency cleaner worldwide

Fans of our free anti-malware solutions will be delighted: The most recent remodeled version of Emsisoft Emergency Kit 2.0 is the first portable free malware scanner with dual-scan engine. The emergency kit against virtual parasites of any kind can be launched directly from removable media devices such as USB sticks or a CD-ROM without being installed. (click here.)

Today’s reading reco’s:

* The boss is watching, look busy: Employers step up social media snooping

Employers are planning to routinely monitor what staff members say on social networks — but they risk finding out too much about their workers’ personal lives.Read more..

* Tips for navigating Windows 8 with your mouse

“Navigating Windows 8 with a mouse and keyboard will definitely take some getting used to, but Greg Shultz gives you some hints to get you started.Read more..

* Enhance Your Online Search Experience with Yahoo Axis

Yahoo, in an effort to to get us out of the archaic method for which we perform searches and to improve its’ position in the world of search engines, recently developed and released a very cool iOS app and browser plugin called Yahoo! Axis. Yahoo! Axis, at this point, is available as a browser plugin […]” Read more..

And just because:

I get lots of important mail…

Today’s quote:Gratitude is the least of the virtues, but ingratitude is the worst of vices.” ~ Thomas Fuller

Copyright 2007-2012 © “Tech Paul” (Paul Eckstrom). All Rights Reserved.


>> Folks, don’t miss an article! To get Tech – for Everyone articles delivered to your e-mail Inbox, click here, or to subscribe in your RSS reader, click here. <<


All we really have, in the end, are our stories.
Make yours great ones. Ones to be proud of.

June 5, 2012 Posted by | add device, antivirus, computers, free software, Internet, iPhone, Portable Computing, tech, Windows 8 | , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Worldwide Telescope Now In Your Browser

A while ago now, I shared with my readers my visit to Microsoft Research headquarters here in the Silicon Valley, where I witnessed the “unveiling” of a new application called “the worldwide telescope”.
(please see, The WorldWide Telescope: An amazing app)

IMHO, this is simply the best exploration and education tool for astronomy (though you can explore our Earth quite impressively too) available.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Worldwide Telescope Now In Your Browser“, posted with vodpod

So, I was rather pleased to read on C/Net’s News that this terrific program has been ‘ported’ for use via a Silverlight-enabled web browser (Internet Explorer). Download the “client” (a plug-in) and you can now browse the heavens anywhere, anytime.

Instead of Copy > Paste-ing, I’ll just refer you to the C/Net article, for details.

Copyright 2007-9 © Tech Paul. All rights reserved. post to jaanix

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March 21, 2009 Posted by | advice, computers, Internet, kids and the Internet, News, tech | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Explore the galaxy with the Worldwide Telescope*

Yesterday A few weeks ago I attended an event at Microsoft’s Silicon Valley Research Center and learned about the technologies of the future.

Well, sort of. What I saw was an overview of what Microsoft is doing in the area of R&D– research and development.
Microsoft is planning on sticking around for a while, and they understand that technology is innovation… not a stagnant build-it-once-sell-it-a-million-times type thing, like a paperclip.

This from their Website: “Microsoft Research is dedicated to conducting both basic and applied research in computer science and software engineering. Its goals are to enhance the user experience on computing devices, reduce the cost of writing and maintaining software, and invent novel computing technologies.”

It was an interesting and informative event, and I want to take a minute and thank those folks involved.

* The keynote technology displayed was a program that is available now, and it is pretty amazing — especially when one considers the amount of data that must be accessed — it’s a virtual picture of the universe. And the best part is, you can explore it.
Yes, you can fly to Mars… or Rigel.. or the crab nebula.. or the top of Mt. Rainier here on earth (Virtual Earth is one data source).

“A state-of-the-art combination of software and Web 2.0 services, WorldWide Telescope offers terabytes of high-resolution images, astronomical data, and guided tours that bring the universe to your fingertips.” (again, from Website.)

This isn’t just pictures folks, when you right-click on Mars (for example) and select Properties, you will be offered practically every known fact about Mars. This is an unparalleled learning tool!

The engine behind this is kind of hard to explain; maybe.. real-time, super-advanced PowerPoint? Infinite MSN Maps?
But I don’t have to try to explain it. You can see it for yourself, and I highly suggest you do. Simply stunning.

To read more about the project, click here.
To download it for yourself, click here.

I found this clip which was a “sneak peak” presented by Roy Gould and Microsoft’s Curtis Wong. It will give you some idea…

*Original posting May 23, 2008.

Copyright 2007-8 © Tech Paul. All rights reserved.jaanix post to jaanix

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July 5, 2008 Posted by | computers, how to, tech | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The WorldWide Telescope: An amazing app

Yesterday I attended an event at Microsoft’s Silicon Valley Research Center and learned  about the technologies of the future.

Well, sort of. What I saw was an overview of what Microsoft is doing in the area of R&D– research and development.
Microsoft is planning on sticking around for a while, and they understand that technology is innovation… not a stagnant build-it-once-sell-it-a-million-times type thing, like a paperclip.

This from their Website: “Microsoft Research is dedicated to conducting both basic and applied research in computer science and software engineering. Its goals are to enhance the user experience on computing devices, reduce the cost of writing and maintaining software, and invent novel computing technologies.”

It was an interesting and informative event, and I want to take a minute and thank those folks involved.

* The keynote technology displayed was a program that is available now, and it is pretty amazing — especially when one considers the amount of data that must be accessed — it’s a virtual picture of the universe. And the best part is, you can explore it.
Yes, you can fly to Mars… or Rigel.. or the crab nebula.. or the top of Mt. Rainier here on earth (Virtual Earth is one data source).

“A state-of-the-art combination of software and Web 2.0 services, WorldWide Telescope offers terabytes of high-resolution images, astronomical data, and guided tours that bring the universe to your fingertips.” (again, from Website.)

This isn’t just pictures folks, when you right-click on Mars (for example) and select Properties, you will be offered practically every known fact about Mars. This is an unparalleled learning tool!

The engine behind this is kind of hard to explain; maybe.. real-time, super-advanced PowerPoint? Infinite MSN Maps?
But I don’t have to try to explain it. You can see it for yourself, and I highly suggest you do. Simply stunning.

To read more about the project, click here.
To download it for yourself, click here.

 I found this clip which was a “sneak peak” presented by Roy Gould and Microsoft’s Curtis Wong. It will give you some idea…

Copyright 2007-8 © Tech Paul. All rights reserved.jaanix post to jaanix

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May 23, 2008 Posted by | computers, Internet, PC, software, tech, Web 2.0 | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments