Tech – for Everyone

Tech Tips and Tricks & Advice – written in plain English.

Windows Technical Department

I just got a phone call from some Indian claiming to be from the “Windows Technical Department”; he addressed me by name, and he started to tell me that there were serious problems with my computer, but I told him he is a vile criminal, and hung up on him.

This was my second such call this week. So be aware, folks, the fake Microsoft tech support phone call scammers are still quite active. Remind your friends and loved ones of this fact, and tell them that no way, no how, are such calls legitimate. Maybe even refer them to this resource: http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0346-tech-support-scams.

Keep these other tips rules in mind:

  • Don’t give control of your computer to a third party who calls you out of the blue.
  • Do not rely on caller ID alone to authenticate a caller. Criminals spoof caller ID numbers. They may appear to be calling from a legitimate company or a local number, when they’re not even in the same country as you.
  • Online search results might not be the best way to find technical support or get a company’s contact information. Scammers place online ads to convince you to call them. They pay to boost their ranking in search results so their websites and phone numbers appear above those of legitimate companies. If you want tech support, look for a company’s contact information on their software package or on your receipt.
  • Never provide your credit card or financial information to someone who calls and claims to be from tech support.
  • If a caller pressures you to buy a computer security product or says there is a subscription fee associated with the call, hang up. If you’re concerned about your computer, call your security software company directly and ask for help.
  • Never give your password on the phone. No legitimate organization calls you and asks for your password.

See, that’s the nice thing about our modern ‘flat earth’ (globalization/”world-wide web”): you don’t have to only worry about the bad actors in your town, but every bad actor on the planet can reach into your home.
Yippee yahoo.

Today’s quote:View your life with KINDSIGHT. Stop beating yourself up about things from your past. Instead of slapping your forehead and asking, “What was I thinking,” breathe and ask yourself the kinder question, “What was I learning?” ~ Karen Salmansohn,

Copyright 2007-2015 © “Tech Paul” (Paul Eckstrom). All Rights Reserved.


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May 1, 2015 - Posted by | advice, cyber crime, Internet scam, security | , , , , ,

8 Comments »

  1. So what makes you believe the guy was Hindu?

    Like

    Comment by Mick | May 2, 2015 | Reply

    • Mick,
      I probably shouldn’t have used that street jargon term for ‘New Delhi Call Center Operator’. I’ll change it to “Indian”, as his belief system is hardly the point. It may not be politically correct to say so but the reality is: if the call is unsolicited, and the caller speaks Indian-accented English, and they tell you there’s a serious problem, it’s a scam (IRS scam/Tech Support scam/Bank Error scam/etc.). (Clues. Tip-offs. Red flags…)

      Like

      Comment by techpaul | May 2, 2015 | Reply

      • Dear techpaul,

        I wasn’t trying to ‘split hairs’, sir, and had no intention of making you feel uncomfortable, but some people MAY have found it insulting or condescending to refer to an unknown caller as someone of a specific race or religion.

        I’ve received several telephone calls myself from similar operators, but I’m afraid my language turns the air blue. I generally start off by telling them that I’ve probably forgotten more about computers than they’ve ever known … though I know that MAY not be the case. I then go on to ask why someone claiming to be a representative would be contacting me as I don’t run a Windows Operating System on my computer, to which they reply “Which operating system are you using then?” That’s when the air begins to turn blue, as I say if you’re so clever, you tell me.

        I wish you well, sir, and I must say that I particularly enjoy reading your emails and reading the comments.

        Be well, techpaul.

        Lots of Love and Light.

        Mick
        x x x x
        x x x

        P.S. Please don’t be offended, or alarmed, at the ”x’s’. It’s merely a logo, of sorts, that I’ve used for some 30-odd years now.

        Like

        Comment by Mick | May 2, 2015 | Reply

        • Mick,
          It is never my intention to offend readers. But my best guess is, if 100% of these telephone scams don’t originate in India, the number is quite close to 100. And I’m trying to educate people how to spot scams so they do not become victims… such as today’s (Saturday, 5/2) article.

          Like

          Comment by techpaul | May 2, 2015 | Reply

          • Dear techpaul,

            I didn’t honestly believe that you had any intention of offending anyone, it’s just that SOME people tend to take offence at the slightest thing.

            I agree that the majority of scam calls are PROBABLY originated in India, but my latest one, apparently, originated in Scotland, UK … at least, that’s what I was led to believe when I dialled 1471, which is the number to find out the last telephone number that called our house phone, but I do appreciate that some of these ‘clever’ scammers will have ways of redirecting telephone calls they make to others’ telephone numbers.

            Be well, sir.

            Lots of Love and Light.

            Mick
            x x x x
            x x x

            Like

            Comment by Mick | May 2, 2015 | Reply

            • Mick, you’re quite right. But people that hyper-sensitive, well, they have my apologies, and my invitation to read other tech websites.

              And yes, the phone number you saw was “spoofed” (telemarketers (generally) spoof to a number in your own area code. Scammers (generally) spoof real numbers.). CallerID is not reliable.

              Like

              Comment by techpaul | May 2, 2015 | Reply

  2. Reblogged this on What's On My PC and commented:
    DO NOT FALL VICTIM to these FAKE MICROSOFT TECH SUPPORT CALLS… Tech Paul at Tech-for Everyone has posted “rules” that you need to keep in mind. Probably, the most important rule is NEVER relinquish control of your computer to a third party that called you out of the blue.

    Like

    Comment by Ramblinrick | May 2, 2015 | Reply

    • Folks, I have long recommended Rick’s tech blog, What’s On My PC.., but haven’t remembered to do so in a while. So go check it out!

      Like

      Comment by techpaul | May 2, 2015 | Reply


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